In the deep dark woods of the Upper Peninsula lives a creature so huge, science has yet to lock down how big it really is.

It wasn't discovered until 1992, but the giant fungus, described by one scientific web site as 'upsettingly large' is living underneath the woods near Crystal Falls. It has probably been alive since 440 AD and covers over 91 acres and weighs over 440 tons.

The New York Times described it this way:

...a 1,500-year-old parasitic mold, with growing tentacles that foraged beneath the soil for roots and decaying wood to devour.

Late night hosts Johnny Carson and David Letterman made fun of it, with Letterman even creating his signature 'Top Ten List' about it.

Top Ten Facts about the giant 100-ton fungus found in Michigan....
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10. Came out of hiding to testify as witness in Gotti trial.
 9. Bill Clinton once tried to smoke some of it.
 8. Has vanity plate: "FUNGUS-1"
 7. Some polls show it running neck-and-neck wtih Jerry Brown.
 6. Elvis once had staff try to buldoze it into a 40-acre pizza.
 5. Section of it used to make William Shatner's hairpiece.
 4. Might be an old Y-M-C-A they forgot to disinfect.
 3. Beleived to be smarter than Quayle.
 2. Nicknamed "Debbie".
 1. Tastes like chicken.

But they haven't found the end to the damn thing. Yet.

Scientists who discovered what is affectionately referred to as the 'Humongous Fungus' still haven't been able to pin down where the fungus begins and ends. It may be bigger than originally thought. They've already reconfigured its size twice.

Can you see the giant fungus? Yes and no. Much of what is know as Armillaria gallica is wrapped around tree roots underground, but every spring, the giant fungus sprouts thousands of honey mushrooms at the surface.

The residents of Crystal Falls celebrate Michigan's largest living creature every year at the Humongous Fungus Fest, which features the world's largest mushroom pizza, made from the honey mushrooms, among other things.

So who wins if the apocalypse comes, the giant mushroom or the cockroach?

Tom Bruns, a fungal ecologist at the University of California says, “I’ll bet on Armillaria."

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