Detroit-born musician Jack White can now add "doctor" to his title.

At Wayne State University's Friday commencement ceremony at Fox Theatre, White received an honorary doctorate from the college, the Detroit Free Press reports.

Wayne State University President Roy Wilson presents the honorary degree to White saying,

"Wayne State presents a doctor of humane letters degree to Jack White III... for your your dedication to the city of Detroit and your significant contribution to the arts, as one of the most prolific and renowned artists of the past two decades. The youngest of ten children, you were born and raised in southwest Detroit. After graduation from Cass Tech High School, you worked as an upholsterer, played in underground bands, and even put in a semester at Wayne State, before founding the White Stripes, a garage rock duo that revolutionized music. This hard-hitting, blues-influenced band produced a raw sound that could only be born out of ta city of unyielding tenacity and hustle, a sound that could only come out of Detroit."

He goes on to praise White's musical achievements and the many ways he has given back to the city of Detroit.

In his acceptance speech, White says,

"Thank you very much for this honor. It's absolutely incredible... As a teenager, I was a busboy in a restaurant in this building, so it's nice to be back here for a different reason."

He speaks about attending film classes at Wayne State and how much that meant to him and helped shape him as an artist.

He tells the story of sneaking into a class that was discussing 'Citizen Cane' saying,

"I needed to learn more. I learned more from that one film and that one scene from 'The Graduate,' about expression and purpose, to last me a lifetime. It's with profound joy and pride that the Cass Corridor neighborhood where I went to high school, bussed tables, took classes in film, and performed for the first time on stage, is now home to a new a vinyl record-pressing plant, providing jobs for Detroiters. We're producing records by The Stooges, The MC-5, The Glories, The Supremes, Tamla Motown artists, and as long as it stands, it will promote and produce works that are important to Detroit's history and evidence of its creative humanity. Thank you everyone here at Wayne State, and thank you to the graduates."