The Great Lakes and the forests of Michigan have plenty of invasive species and now the DNR says there are two more to put on the list for the state.

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Invasive Species in Michigan

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Yesterday there were 51 invasive species on the list of biological and invasive found in Michigan. Today there are 53 on the list.

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Michiganders have long known about zebra mussels in the Great Lakes, rivers, and inland lakes along with the spotted lanternfly, emerald ash borer, northern snakehead, sea lamprey, spotted knapweed, and many more.

How Do Invasive Species Get to Michigan?

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Most invasive species get to Michigan via ships and shipping containers from other countries around the world and sometimes, even other parts of the United States.

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Some invasive species are released intentionally while others are accidental. Sometimes fishermen bring bait in from another region and then release it when they are done fishing. Some species pop up from gardening, ornamental fish ponds, food, and even pets. No matter how they get here it is important to know what they are to get rid of them when they are spotted.

2 New Invasive Species Added to the List by Michigan DNR

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In an update from the Michigan Invasive Species Program news release, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources has added two more invasive species to the list.

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First up, is the mountain pine beetle which is a huge threat to pine trees across Michigan. The mountain pine beetle is the most aggressive, persistent, and destructive bark beetle in the western U.S. and Canada. This beetle could cause major damage to Michigan's pine trees and also create severe losses for several industries like timber products, plant nurseries, and tourism.

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What may look like a pretty flower around a lake or a wetland can easily turn into a huge problem for a body of water ecosystem.  The water primrose can quickly establish itself, spread fast, and choke out native species making it difficult for boating and water access. There is a known population in Ottawa County and two more in the greater Detroit area. It is important to spot the water primrose early because once it gets established it can be very difficult to remove. If you see this plant near a water source immediately contact the DNR.

For all invasive species to be on the lookout for that are located on Michigan's watch list, click here.

10 Invasive Plants & Insects You Should Destroy if You Spot Them in Michigan

Unfortunately, Michigan has a long list of both plants and insects that are invasive. Here's what to be on the lookout for.

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